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Archive for the ‘How to finish Needlepoint’ Category

NeedlePaint Mask Version 2

Written by Peggy BondEscher Mask

The new NeedlePaint mask, inspired by M.C. Escher, is designed for quick stitching and assembly. It is slightly lighter weight with fabric for the nose and chin portions, but the central needlepoint band retains its form to allow freedom of air flow.

Since the band is a 9-1/4” x 2-3/4” rectangle, it can be stitched in about one half of the time of our full NeedlePaint masks. The mask is a little less formal.

The materials needed are:

  • Cotton fabric for liner and strap trim
  • Cotton fabric for filter pocket (optional)
  • Ear strap material
  • Nose clip material (optional)

Step 1. After blocking the finished canvas, trim away excess canvas leaving no more than 1/4” of blank canvas. Cut two 10 “ x  3” strips of cotton fabric which will serve for the nose and chin portions of the mask. (One could go two tone and make the nose and chin portions of different colors.)

With right sides together sew strips to the top and bottom of your needlepoint canvas. Press fabric away from canvas. Do not press seam open. Top stitch the fabric side of each seam.

Position the mask pattern so that the needlepoint band is centered between the nose and chin darts and cut out the mask. The shaped pattern is similar to our Geometric Face Mask shown below. Using the same pattern cut one liner or two if making the optional filter pocket.

Top Sticch

Step 2. Fold the canvas along center line with right-sides together, matching the two upper nose points and the two lower chin points. Stitch 3/8” seam and press open. Repeat for liners and optional filter pocket.

If using the filter pocket, sew a ½” hem on each cheek edge.

Nose Clip

Step 3. Cut a piece of fabric 1” by ½” longer than the selected nose clip. Sew a ¼” hem on each short edge of this fabric nose sleeve. Place the nose sleeve on the liner or filter pocket centered ½” below the nose seam. Sew in place. Press so long edge lines up with top of liner or pocket.

The nose clip will be inserted after the rest of the assembly is completed.

Step 4. Place right sides together, carefully aligning the seams of the nose and chin darts on all pieces. If using the optional filter pocket, it will be the closest to needlepoint mask.

Sew the ¼” seam along the top and bottom of the mask and turn the mask inside out. Be careful not to pull on the edge of the needlepoint canvas as it can separate easily. Press the seamed edges and top stitch.

IMG_2595

Step 5. For the ear strap sleeves, cut two 1-1/2” strip of liner fabric that are ½” longer than the ear edges of the mask. Sew to each ear edge with ¼” seam. Press top and bottom edges down. Then press a ¼’ fold on free edge and fold to back aligning the folded edges with the ear edge stitches. This will leave a ½” sleeve for the ear strap.

The straps can be tucked under the fold before stitching the sleeve in place or can be threaded through with a safety pin after stitching.

Check out these two new designs we have created for you!

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Mosaic Face Mask Panel Needlepoint Canvas

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Geometric Face Mask Needlepoint Canvas

NeedlePaint Masks Unmasked!

Written by Peggy Bond

Two needlepoint face masks

After the initial rush to get cotton masks made for all my neighbors and friends, I was out of material, elastic, and thread. Stores were closed and mail order was going to take at least a week. So into the closet I went and found some 18 and 14 mesh needlepoint canvas and a stash of thread.

Thread Stash

I had been thinking about making a needlepoint mask but wondered how it would hold up with washing. With time on my hands, this was the perfect project for lockdown. The pattern I has used for the cotton masks was not going to work with stiff needlepoint canvas.

Flat tent stitch cropped

Searching the internet, I found a pattern that I thought would work from PrettyHandyGirl.com. I used the Inside Liner pattern from Pretty Handy Girl and then set to work on my Geometric Mask on 18 mesh canvas using random colors from my stash and a classic background Flat/Tent stitch from A Pageant of Pattern for Needlepoint Canvases by Sherlee Lantz.

Geometric Needlepoint Face Mask

The stitching went quickly and soon I was ready to assemble, check the fit, and then wash it. (Finishing options will be the subject of my next blog.) The fit was a little large for me but fit my husband perfectly. Washing was a success. I washed it by hand in Woolite and hot water. Then hung it out to dry. The mask held its shape well, so on to the next one.

Turtle Design Needlepoint Face Mask

For the next mask, I redrew the pattern to make the top more slanted and picked out a NeedlePaint design used on a hatband – my Hawaiian turtles. The turtles were done on 14 mesh canvas using the continental stitch with the background in alternating rows of the Byzantine stitch from Jo Ippolito Christensen’s The Needlepoint Book.

I chose to alternate two different blue threads because that was what I had on hand. Alas, it was not enough and I had to ask for more from the NeedlePaint staff who have been working tirelessly to keep shipping orders while I am in lockdown elsewhere. Many thanks to them!

I am now on my third mask – the lotus blossom shown in the photo at the top of the blog.

Now, sewing it up!

Lotus mask

Remember your mask will not be a replacement for an N95 or surgical mask. 

There are a couple options to consider assembling your NeedlePaint mask – a filter pocket and nose clip. Pretty Handy Girl describes the material choices for the nose clip and straps. I agree with her recommendation to use the coffee bag flat ties for the nose clip. I am not a coffee drinker but luckily my husband is. However, her other suggestion works too. Her discussion of adjustable strap materials is very good. Due to unavailability of any of the materials suggested, I have been opted for ¼ inch ribbons of which I have a stash.

The materials needed are:

  • Cotton fabric for liner and strap trim
  • Cotton fabric for filter pocket (optional)
  • Ear strap material 
  • Nose clip material (optional)
  • ¼ in double fold bias tape or cotton fabric for homemade bias strip

Step 1. After blocking the finished canvas, trim away excess canvas leaving no more than 1/8” of blank canvas. Place on liner material with straight cheek edges aligning with the straight grain of the fabric. Cut one liner.

For optional filter pocket, cut a second liner of the same size. 

Trimmed

Step 2. Fold the canvas along center line with right-side together, matching the two upper nose points and the two lower chin points. Stitch 3/8” seam and press open. Repeat for liners and optional filter pocket.

If using the filter pocket, sew a ½” hem on each cheek edge.

Stiching

Step 3. Optional Nose Clip

Cut a piece of fabric 1” by ½” longer than the selected nose clip. Sew a ¼” hem on each short edge of this fabric nose sleeve. Place the nose sleeve on the liner or filter pocket centered ½” below the nose seam. Sew in place. Press so long edge lines up with top of liner or pocket.

The nose clip will be inserted after the rest of the assembly is completed.

Nose Clip

Step 4. Align NeedlePaint mask and liner with wrong sides together. If including filter pocket, place the pocket on top of the liner. Match nose and chin seams. Baste together.

Bind the upper and lower edges of the mask with the bias tape or strips. If using ¼” double fold tape, place over the edge of the mask and liner (and optional pocket) and stitch through all thicknesses. 

Bias trim 2

The above photo is not of a mask but from another project because I do not have a source of double fold bias tape. The lotus mask was finished with my own bias strip, machine sewn on the canvas side and turned and finished by hand on the liner/pocket side.

The pre-made double fold tap is easier to use but often you can’t find a matching color for your project.

Bian Trim

Step 5. For the ear strap sleeves, cut two 1-1/2” strip of liner fabric that are ½” longer than the ear edged of the masks.  Sew to each ear edge with ¼” seam. Press top and bottom edges down. Then press a ¼’ fold on free edge and fold to back aligning the folded edges with the ear edge stitches. This will leave a ½” sleeve for the ear strap.

IMG_2595

The straps can be tucked under the fold before stitching the sleeve in place or can be threaded through with a safety pin after stitching.

Ear Sleeves

Step 6. Now it is time to insert the nose clip. It should slip easily into sleeve and then sew off the ends by hand. DONE!

Lotus Blossom Face Mask Needlepoint Canvas

Check out our new Lotus Blossom Face Mask and Sea Turtle Face Mask needlepoint canvases available on our website!

Sea Turtle Face Mask Needlepoint Canvas

Happy Stitching!

Brick Works – How to Finish a Needlepoint Brick Doorstop

Written By Peggy Bond

Needlepoint Brick Doorstop

A needlepoint doorstop is one of the most functional needlepoint projects you can stitch; and finishing it doesn’t require any unusual supplies or skills. If you can stitch a canvas, you can finish the doorstop.

What you need 2 2

The supplies are simple:

  • Needlepointed canvas
  • Brick
  • Lightweight quilt batting or flannel to cover the brick
  • Felt or heavy wool for the bottom of the brick
  • Needle and thread
  • Optional: a glue gun

(Note: Dimensions for these directions are for an 8″ x 4″ x 2″ concrete brick.)

Blocking Your Canvas

Preparing the Canvas: Begin by blocking the finished canvas so that it is square. If the canvas has been stitched on a frame, there should require minimal blocking that often can be completed with a steam iron. Put the needlepoint face down on the ironing board or towels. Set the iron for steam and hold ¼” above the canvas. While canvas if warm and damp, tack it into final shape on a Styrofoam surface or a board as shown above.

Corner

Stitch the corners of the blocked canvas by folding the right sides of each corner together as stitching through the last needlepointed stitched. This can be done by hand or by machine.

simply trim corners

Trim the mitered corners to ½” and press open. Turn canvas right sides out. 

Cut batting for brick

Wrapping the Brick: Since the brick has irregular edges that easily catch on the canvas, it is recommended that you cover the brick with lightweight quilt batting or flannel.  Cotton/bamboo batting is my preferred choice. This will give a smoothness to the finished project and protect the canvas from snags and wear. Cut a 12.5″ square of cotton batting and trim 4″ x 1.75″ from each corner as shown above.

Now here is where there is a choice – to glue or to sew.

Brick in the batting

Sewers will miter the edges with a ¼” seam as described above for the canvas. Again this can be done by hand or by machine. Turn the batting so that the stitched edges are to the inside, i.e. facing the brick. Insert the brick with its sharp/squared edges down.

Wrapped Brick

Fold over the batting and stitch in place. The wrapping can easily be glue gunned in place. Not my thing, but a good process for this part of the finishing. A glue gun is not recommended for the final two steps of the finishing process.

Bottom of brick

Putting It Together: Insert the covered brick into the finished needlepoint canvas with the bottom of the brick facing up. Lace the canvas in place. Cut a 8″ x 4″ rectangle of felt or heavy wool. Felt is easier to work with as it does not ravel. Stitch in place. Voila a finished doorstop.

Finished

No more slamming doors!

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Here at NeedlePaint.com, we offer a personalized brick cover needlepoint canvas, and a custom designed needlepoint brick cover canvas for you to stitch.

NeedlePaint personalized brick cover

A-CROSS YOUR BACKGROUND

Tired of the Tent Stitch? There are several cross stitches which are great substitutes. They cover well and give texture to a needlepoint piece, or your brick cover. 

The simplest is the Small Upright Cross that is worked on the diagonal as shown below.

Small upright cross

The one thing to remember with this stitch is to keep the crosses consistent. In other words, do the vertical stitch first and then have the horizontal on cross over. Or, do it the other way around. 

Since this stitch is small and has a firm finish, I have used it on belts.

Cross section CTF Belt

For this Colorado Trail belt, the Continental tent stitch was use for the lettering and logo in white and the small areas of these were filled with green tent stitch. The tent stitch was also used for a 3-row border along both edges which will be turned over when sew to a leather backing. Then, the small upright cross was used to fill the background.

For something a little more dramatic, there is the Long-Armed Cross. This stitch has longer stitches and give more visual relief.

Lond armed cross. png

This stitch takes a bit of attention in getting started and some counting, but it is worth the effort. It made a nice wave-light background for the loon, on my Loon Brick Cover needlepoint canvas.

Loon in Long-armend Cross

Loon Brick 4 Color

Both of these examples were worked on 18-pt canvas with 6 strands of DMC floss.

Changing canvas size and thread give a very different look as seen below on the brick on 10-pt canvas with 3 strands of Waverly wool.

Brick in Long-armed Cross

Varying lengths of red, grey, white, and black yarn were used for the top and ends in the Long-Armed Cross, and a single row of the Long-Armed Cross was stitched on each side surrounded by the Continental tent stitch.